Monthly Archives: August 2013

Two Things That Make it Hard to Reduce the Cost of Electricity Significantly

Often, the people who are in charge of electricity generation and distribution aspire to lower the cost of electric power. But they tend to find it difficult to do so (in a significant way). There are, as it turns out, two things that make it hard to reduce the cost of electricity significantly.

The first thing that makes it hard to reduce the cost of electricity significantly is the fact that the cheaper sources of electricity tend to be less friendly to the environment.

The second thing that makes it hard to reduce the cost of electricity significantly is the fact that there are vested interests in the power industry. To put it bluntly, there are people who benefit when the cost of power is high. These tend to be highly influential individuals. So a lobbyist in that group of people, upon hearing about plans to reduce the cost of electricity, only needs to go his or her Gmail (www.gmail.com) account, and proceed to log in to Gmail. He or she then sends an email or two, and for what appears to be an ‘inexplicable reason’ to the rest of us mere mortals, the plans that were in place to reduce the cost of electricity are shelved indefinitely!

Three Models for Running a Web-Based Electricity Cost Minimization Course

Three models exist, through which a web-based electricity cost minimization course can be run.

The first model, through which a web-based electricity cost minimization course can be run, is that in which the course materials are posted in a website (as tutorials), and people interested in the course then access them there. The arrangement can be such that the interested people have to sign up (for free or at a fee), before being allowed to actually access the course materials.

The second model through which a web-based electricity cost minimization course can be run, is that in which the course materials are emailed to interested learners. This is a very simple model to implement. For a start, the person running the course can sign up for, say, Gmail. Thereafter, he or she would only be visiting the Gmail.com sign in page on a regular basis, to send the course materials to the students, as they traverse through the course.

The third model through which a web-based electricity cost minimization course can be run, is that in which the course materials are packaged as videos, and posted online where students can access them. This model is very appropriate for this time, when most people seem to be averse to the idea of reading text, but quite open to the idea of absorbing information from videos.